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Les parutions sur ScienceDirect. Mot clé : "Muscle"

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Les parutions sur ScienceDirect. Mot clé "Stiffness"

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Les parutions sur ScienceDirect. Mot clé "EMG"

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  • Neuro-Ophthalmology/Orbit
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Case Reviews in Ophthalmology

    Author(s): Neil J. Friedman, Peter K. Kaiser







  • 7 Nerve Compression Syndromes
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): S. Brent Brotzman, Steven R. Novotny







  • 18 Lateral and Medial Humeral Epicondylitis
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Todd S. Ellenbecker, George J. Davies







  • 20 General Principles of Shoulder Rehabilitation
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Robert C. Manske







  • 22 Rotator Cuff Tendinitis in the Overhead Athlete
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Michael J. O’Brien, Felix H. Savoie







  • 23 Rotator Cuff Repair
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Robert C. Manske







  • 26 Rehabilitation for Biceps Tendon Disorders and SLAP Lesions
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Geoffrey S. Van Thiel, Sanjeev Bhatia, Neil S. Ghodadra, Jonathan Yong Kim, Matthew T. Provencher







  • 30 Shoulder Exercises for Injury Prevention in the Throwing Athlete
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): John A. Guido, Keith Meister







  • 32 Postural Consideration for the Female Athlete’s Shoulder
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Janice K. Loudon







  • 35 Thoracic Outlet Syndrome in the Overhead Athlete
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Robert C. Manske







  • 43 Inferior Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): S. Brent Brotzman, John J. Jasko







  • 58 Hip Strength and Kinematics in Patellofemoral Syndrome
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Lori A. Bolgla







  • 61 Articular Cartilage Procedures of the Knee
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): G. Kelley Fitzgerald, James J. Irrgang







  • 72 Therapeutic Exercise for the Cervical Spine
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Christopher J. Durall







  • 74 Core Stabilization Training
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Barbara J. Hoogenboom, Kyle Kiesel







  • 76 Rehabilitation Following Lumbar Disc Surgery
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: a Team Approach

    Author(s): Adriaan Louw







  • 16 Secondary Hypertension
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Hypertension: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease

    Author(s): Ailia W. Ali, Patrick J. Strollo







  • Procedure 51 Open Carpal Tunnel Release
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Operative Techniques: Hand and Wrist Surgery

    Author(s): Yuki Fujihara, Kevin C. Chung, Jennifer F. Waljee







  • Procedure 5 Anterior C1-C2 Arthrodesis
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Operative Techniques: Spine Surgery

    Author(s): Michael Schiraldi, Eli M. Baron, Alexander R. Vaccaro







  • Procedure 18 Anterior Thoracic Diskectomy and Corpectomy
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 2018
    Source:Operative Techniques: Spine Surgery

    Author(s): Christopher C. Harrod, Devan B. Moody, Alexander R. Vaccaro







  • META-DES.Oracle: Meta-learning and feature selection for dynamic ensemble selection
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Information Fusion, Volume 38

    Author(s): Rafael M.O. Cruz, Robert Sabourin, George D.C. Cavalcanti

    Dynamic ensemble selection (DES) techniques work by estimating the competence level of each classifier from a pool of classifiers, and selecting only the most competent ones for the classification of a specific test sample. The key issue in DES is defining a suitable criterion for calculating the classifiers’ competence. There are several criteria available to measure the level of competence of base classifiers, such as local accuracy estimates and ranking. However, using only one criterion may lead to a poor estimation of the classifier’s competence. In order to deal with this issue, we have proposed a novel dynamic ensemble selection framework using meta-learning, called META-DES. A meta-classifier is trained, based on the meta-features extracted from the training data, to estimate the level of competence of a classifier for the classification of a given query sample. An important aspect of the META-DES framework is that multiple criteria can be embedded in the system encoded as different sets of meta-features. However, some DES criteria are not suitable for every classification problem. For instance, local accuracy estimates may produce poor results when there is a high degree of overlap between the classes. Moreover, a higher classification accuracy can be obtained if the performance of the meta-classifier is optimized for the corresponding data. In this paper, we propose a novel version of the META-DES framework based on the formal definition of the Oracle, called META-DES.Oracle. The Oracle is an abstract method that represents an ideal classifier selection scheme. A meta-feature selection scheme using an overfitting cautious Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO) is proposed for improving the performance of the meta-classifier. The difference between the outputs obtained by the meta-classifier and those presented by the Oracle is minimized. Thus, the meta-classifier is expected to obtain results that are similar to the Oracle. Experiments carried out using 30 classification problems demonstrate that the optimization procedure based on the Oracle definition leads to a significant improvement in classification accuracy when compared to previous versions of the META-DES framework and other state-of-the-art DES techniques.





  • Gold-modified indium tin oxide as a transparent window in optoelectronic diagnostics of electrochemically active biofilms
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 15 August 2017
    Source:Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Volume 94

    Author(s): Igor Schmidt, Alaaeldin Gad, Gregor Scholz, Heidi Boht, Michael Martens, Meinhard Schilling, Hutomo Suryo Wasisto, Andreas Waag, Uwe Schröder

    Microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) are one of the emerging green bioenergy domains that are utilizing microorganisms for wastewater treatment or electrosynthesis. Real-time monitoring of bioprocess during operation is a prerequisite for understanding and further improving bioenergy harvesting. Optical methods are powerful tools for this, but require transparent, highly conductive and biocompatible electrodes. Whereas indium tin oxide (ITO) is a well-known transparent conductive oxide, it is a non-ideal platform for biofilm growth. Here, a straightforward approach of surface modification of ITO anodes with gold (Au) is demonstrated, to enhance direct microbial biofilm cultivation on their surface and to improve the produced current densities. The trade-off between the electrode transmittance (critical for the underlying integrated sensors) and the enhanced growth of biofilms (crucial for direct monitoring) is studied. Au-modified ITO electrodes show a faster and reproducible biofilm growth with three times higher maximum current densities and about 6.9 times thicker biofilms compared to their unmodified ITO counterparts. The electrochemical analysis confirms the enhanced performance and the reversibility of the ITO/Au electrodes. The catalytic effect of Au on the ITO surface seems to be the key factor of the observed performance improvement since the changes in the electrode conductivity and their surface wettability are relatively small and in the range of ITO. An integrated platform for the ITO/Au transparent electrode with light-emitting diodes was fabricated and its feasibility for optical biofilm thickness monitoring is demonstrated. Such transparent electrodes with embedded catalytic metals can serve as multifunctional windows for biofilm diagnostic microchips.

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  • Single channel surface EMG control of advanced prosthetic hands: A simple, low cost and efficient approach
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 15 August 2017
    Source:Expert Systems with Applications, Volume 79

    Author(s): Mahmoud Tavakoli, Carlo Benussi, Joao Luis Lourenco

    Surface EMGs have been the primary sources for control of prosthetic hands due to their comfort and naturalness. The recent advances in the development of the prosthetic hands with many degrees of freedom and many actuators, requires many EMG channels to take the full advantage of the complex prosthetic terminals. Some EMG wearable devices were developed lately, that are able to detect several gestures. However, the main drawbacks of these systems are the cost, the size and the system complexity. In this paper, we suggest a simple, fast and low-cost system which can recognize up to 4 gestures with a single channel surface EMG signal. Gestures include hand closing, hand opening, wrist flexion and double wrist flexion. These gestures can be used to control a prosthetic terminal based on predefined grasp postures. We show that by using a high-dimensional feature space, together with a support vector machine algorithm, it is possible to classify these four gestures. Overall, the system showed satisfactory results in terms of classification accuracy, real time gesture recognition, and tolerance to hand movements through integration of a lock gesture. Calibration took only 30 seconds and session independence was demonstrated by high classification accuracy on different test sessions without repeating the calibration. As a case study we use this system to control a previously developed soft prosthetic hand. This is particularly interesting because we show that a simple hardware that has only a single channel EMG, can afford the control of a multi-DOF prosthetic hands. In addition, such system may be used as a general purpose Human Machine Interface for gaming,for controlling multimedia devices, or to control robots.





  • The postural control can be optimized by the first movement initiation condition encountered when submitted to muscle fatigue
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:Human Movement Science, Volume 54

    Author(s): Florian Monjo, Nicolas Forestier

    We investigated whether and how the movement initiation condition (IC) encountered during the early movements performed following focal muscle fatigue affects the postural control of discrete ballistic movements. For this purpose, subjects performed shoulder flexions in a standing posture at maximal velocity under two movement IC, i.e., in self-paced conditions and submitted to a Stroop-like task in which participants had to trigger fast shoulder flexions at the presentation of incongruent colors. Shoulder flexion kinematics, surface muscle activity of focal and postural muscles as well as center-of-pressure kinematics were recorded. The initial IC and the order in which subjects were submitted to these two conditions were varied within two separate experimental sessions. IC schedule was repeated before and after fatigue protocols involving shoulder flexors. The aim of this fatigue procedure was to affect acceleration-generating capacities of focal muscles. In such conditions, the postural muscle activity preceding and accompanying movement execution is expected to decrease. Following fatigue, when subjects initially moved in self-paced conditions, postural muscle activity decreased and scaled to the lower focal peak acceleration. This postural strategy then transferred to the Stroop-like task. In contrast, when subjects initially moved submitted to the Stroop-like task, postural muscle activity did not decrease and this transferred to self-paced movements. Regarding the center-of-pressure peak velocity, which is indicative of the efficiency of the postural actions generated in stabilizing posture, no difference appeared between the two sessions post-fatigue. This highlights an optimization of the postural actions when subjects first moved in self-paced conditions, smaller postural muscle activation levels resulting in similar postural consequences. In conclusion, the level of neuromuscular activity associated with the postural control is affected and can be optimized by the initial movement IC experienced post-fatigue. Beyond the fundamental contributions arising from these results, we point out potential applications for trainers and sports instructors.





  • Immediate effects of respiratory muscle stretching on chest wall kinematics and electromyography in COPD patients
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 242

    Author(s): Rafaela Barros de Sá, Maíra Florentino Pessoa, Ana Gabriela Leal Cavalcanti, Shirley Lima Campos, César Amorim, Armèle Dornelas de Andrade

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of respiratory muscle stretching on chest wall kinematics and electromyographic activity in COPD patients. 28 patients with COPD were randomized into two groups: 14 to the treatment group (TG) and 14 to the control group (CG). The TG underwent a stretching protocol of the rib cage muscles, while the CG remained at rest under similar conditions. After a single session, TG increased the tidal volume of the pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp) (p=0.020) and tidal volume of abdominal rib cage (Vrca) (p=0.043) variations and their percentages in relation to the thoracic wall, Vrcp% (p=0.044) and Vrca% (p=0.022). Also, TG decreased the end-expiratory Vrcp (p=0.013) and the end-inspiratory Vrcp (p=0.011) variations. In addition, there was a reduction in respiratory rate (RR) (p=0.011) and minute volume (MV) (p=0.035), as well as an increase in expiratory time (Te) (p=0.026). There was also an immediate reduction in sternocleidomastoid (p=0.043) and upper trapezium (p=0.034) muscle electrical activity. Then, the study supports the use of stretching to improve COPD chest wall mobility with positive effects on chest wall mechanics, on volume distribution and electromyography.





  • A bio-statistical mining approach for classifying multivariate clinical time series data observed at irregular intervals
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 15 July 2017
    Source:Expert Systems with Applications, Volume 78

    Author(s): Jane Y. Nancy, Nehemiah H. Khanna, Arputharaj Kannan

    In medical information system, the data that describe patient health records are often time stamped. These data are liable to complexities such as missing data, observations at irregular time intervals and large attribute set. Due to these complexities, mining in clinical time-series data, remains a challenging area of research. This paper proposes a bio-statistical mining framework, named statistical tolerance rough set induced decision tree (STRiD), which handles these complexities and builds an effective classification model. The constructed model is used in developing a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to assist the physician in clinical diagnosis. The STRiD framework provides the following functionalities namely temporal pre-processing, attribute selection and classification. In temporal pre-processing, an enhanced fuzzy-inference based double exponential smoothing method is presented to impute the missing values and to derive the temporal patterns for each attribute. In attribute selection, relevant attributes are selected using the tolerance rough set. A classification model is constructed with the selected attributes using temporal pattern induced decision tree classifier. For experimentation, this work uses clinical time series datasets of hepatitis and thrombosis patients. The constructed classification model has proven the effectiveness of the proposed framework with a classification accuracy of 91.5% for hepatitis and 90.65% for thrombosis.





  • Detection of kanamycin and gentamicin residues in animal-derived food using IgY antibody based ic-ELISA and FPIA
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 15 July 2017
    Source:Food Chemistry, Volume 227

    Author(s): Cui Li, Yaoyao Zhang, Sergei A. Eremin, Omar Yakup, Gang Yao, Xiaoying Zhang

    Our aim in this study is to show that IgY antibody based immunoassays could be used to detect antibiotic residues in animal-derived food. Briefly, full antigens of gentamicin (Gent) and kanamycin (Kana) were used to immunize the laying chickens to prepare IgY antibodies. Then, these antibodies were evaluated by FPIA and ic-ELISA to detect Gent/Kana in animal-derived samples. The IC50 of FPIA and ic-ELISA based anti-Gent IgY were 7.70±0.6μg/mL and 0.32±0.06μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of FPIA and ic-ELISA based anti-Kana IgY were 7.97±0.9μg/mL and 0.15±0.01μg/mL. The limits of detection (LOD, IC10) for FPIA based anti-Gent/Kana IgY were 0.17 and 0.007μg/mL, respectively. The LOD for ic-ELISA were both 0.001μg/mL. These results indicated that the ic-ELISA might more suitable for antibiotic residues detection than FPIA.





  • Neck posture during lifting and its effect on trunk muscle activation and lumbar spine posture
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Applied Ergonomics, Volume 62

    Author(s): Thomas M. Hlavenka, Vanessa F.K. Christner, Diane E. Gregory

    Neck and head posture have been found to have a significant influence on the posture of the lower spine region during lifting and both an extended/upward gaze and a flexed/downward gaze have been hypothesized to lead to increased pain and/or overuse of the neck musculature. As a result, strength training recommendations have turned to the use of a retracted neck posture as being the safer posture to assume during lifting. This study examined trunk and neck muscle activity and lumbar spine posture in seven participants while performing moderate load lifts using a retracted neck posture (chin drawn in posteriorly; recently gaining popularity among coaches, trainers, and physical therapists to reduce neck pain during lifting, and freestyle neck posture (no instructions given). The retracted neck resulted in less lumbar spine flexion and increased lumbar erector spinae, external oblique, and sternocleidomastoid activity. The retracted posture also resulted in decreased activity in the thoracic erector spinae and dorsal neck musculature. The increased trunk and sternocleidomastoid activity and decreased spine flexion observed in the seven participants of this study when lifting with a retracted neck may have the potential to help lower the risk of spine pain/injury.





  • A biomechanical and physiological study of office seat and tablet device interaction
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Applied Ergonomics, Volume 62

    Author(s): Eric Weston, Peter Le, William S. Marras

    Twenty subjects performed typing tasks on a desktop computer and touch-screen tablet in two chairs for an hour each, and the effects of chair, device, and their interactions on each dependent measure were recorded. Biomechanical measures of muscle force, spinal load, and posture were examined, while discomfort was measured via heart rate variability (HRV) and subjective reports. HRV was sensitive enough to differentiate between chair and device interactions. Biomechanically, a lack of seat back mobility forced individuals to maintain an upright seating posture with increased extensor muscle forces and increased spinal compression. Effects were exacerbated by forward flexion upon interaction with a tablet device or by slouching. Office chairs should be designed with both the human and workplace task in mind and allow for reclined postures to off-load the spine. The degree of recline should be limited, however, to prevent decreased lumbar lordosis resulting from posterior hip rotation in highly reclined postures.





  • Thermal comfort of seats as visualized by infrared thermography
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Applied Ergonomics, Volume 62

    Author(s): Rosemary Bom Conselho Sales, Romeu Rodrigues Pereira, Maria Teresa Paulino Aguilar, Antônio Valadão Cardoso

    Published studies that deal with the question of how the temperature of chair seats influences human activities are few, but the studies considering such a factor, a function of the type of material, could contribute to improvements in the design of chairs. This study evaluates seat temperatures of 8 types of chairs made of different materials. The parts of the furniture that people come into contact with, and the thermal response of the material to heating and cooling have been evaluated. Infrared thermography was used for this, as it is a non-contact technique that does not present any type of risk in the measurement of temperatures. Seats made of synthetic leather (leatherette), wood and polyester fabric were found to have the highest temperatures, and the plywood seat showed the lowest. The study has also revealed that thermography can contribute to studies of thermal comfort of chair seats in addition to determining the most suitable material.





  • A framework for evaluating muscle activity during repetitive manual material handling in construction manufacturing
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Automation in Construction, Volume 79

    Author(s): X. Li, A. Komeili, M. Gül, M. El-Rich

    Workers in construction sites are exposed to highly labor-intensive tasks. Ergonomic principles, in addition to engineering considerations, should thus be included in the design of workstations in order to minimize the risk of injury. The objective of this paper is to propose a framework to assess muscle force and muscle fatigue development due to manual lifting tasks using surface electromyography (sEMG) and human body modelling. Muscle forces are calculated using the human body model and compared qualitatively to sEMG muscle activities. The results show that sEMG is capable of visualizing muscle activity. However, sEMG application in identifying muscle fatigue development is limited to bulkier and superficial muscle bundles in low fat areas. The proposed human body model, which is driven by kinematic motion capture data, predicts muscle forces during the entire task maneuver. The predicted muscle forces from the human body model are compared with sEMG data from corresponding muscles as well as data available in the literature. In future research, the developed model will be used to determine optimal task maneuvers that minimize muscle forces with the ultimate goal of preventing muscle injuries in workstations.





  • Effects of interface design factors on affective responses and quality evaluations in mobile applications
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 72

    Author(s): Upasna Bhandari, Tillmann Neben, Klarissa Chang, Wen Yong Chua

    Through this study we examined the effects of design factors, namely balance and originality on users' affective responses and subsequent quality evaluations. We effectively manipulated balance and originality to see how it independently and together affects two sub dimensions of emotions i.e. arousal and valance. After this we evaluated the impact of this affective response on pragmatic and hedonic quality perceptions. Experimental results confirmed a significant impact of design factors on emotions and quality perceptions. Usability studies can have a better understanding of how design influences user decision-making. It breaks the efficiency perspective further which has heavily shadowed human computer studies and suggests that affect is equally if not more important when it comes to having desired user reactions from app design.





  • In vivo and rheological approaches for characterizing food oral processing and usefulness of polysaccharides as texture modifiers- A review
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Food Hydrocolloids, Volume 68

    Author(s): Takahiro Funami

    Recent progress of food texture study is reviewed by focusing on in vivo and rheological approaches for characterizing food oral processing as potential measures for product development. The study of food texture should be emphasized in product development because texture is one of the essential elements for food palatability and also relates to the safety of eating with increased importance in this aged society. Also, texture is associated with flavor perception, another important element for food palatability, because of how food is broken down in the mouth and how this food is mixed with saliva, both relating to flavor release from the food. Polysaccharides can serve as texture modifiers in food, and their usefulness should be understood more by food scientists and technologists for the best use. To respond to these motivations, the role of Food Hydrocolloids has been expanding.

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  • A comparison of self-reported emotional and implicit responses to aromas in beer
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Food Quality and Preference, Volume 59

    Author(s): C. Beyts, C. Chaya, F. Dehrmann, S. James, K. Smart, J. Hort

    Sensory scientists are increasingly measuring consumer emotions to aid discrimination between similarly liked products. Some investigations have solely focused on explicit measures of emotional response, asking consumers to self-report their emotions. Others have focused on understanding whether implicit measures such as changes in physiological and facial expression which they believe may capture unconscious responses to stimuli. In this study physiological response and facial expression along with self-reported emotional response and conventional hedonic liking measures towards a range of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral aromas within beer were evaluated. Physiological measures included heart rate and skin temperature, whilst facial expression was assessed by measuring corrugator supercilli and zygomatic major muscle activity using facial electromyography recorded via a MP150WSW (MP150) physiological data acquisition system (Biopac, Goleta, CA, USA). Self-reported emotional response was recorded using a beer specific emotional lexicon. No differences in heart rate and skin temperature were observed in response to presentation of any of the aromas. Facial expression measures found that corrugator supercilli and zygomatic major activity changed in response to unpleasant and pleasant or unpleasant and neutral samples respectively. Liking scores were found to distinguish between more aromas than facial expression measures, allowing distinction between pleasant and neutral samples. Self-reported emotional response was found to be more discriminating than both liking and facial expression measures, allowing discrimination between pleasant and neutral samples as well as between the pleasant samples themselves. The ability for self-reported emotional response to distinguish between pleasant aromas is of particular interest to industry where commercial products may be poorly discriminated on the basis of liking alone. However further work to understand the contribution of implicit measures to understanding emotional response, in particular their association with explicit measures and their representation of unconscious response is required.





  • Manipulation of magnetocapillary flow of ferrofluid in a microchannel
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, Volume 246

    Author(s): U. Banerjee, M. Sabareesh, A.K. Sen

    We report the influence of stationary and moving permanent magnets on the magnetocapillary flow of ferrofluid in a microchannel. With the stationary magnet placed at the microchannel exit, a sudden increase in the meniscus velocity was observed when the ferrofluid meniscus comes under the influence of the magnet. In case of the moving magnet, for a fixed initial magnet location, the meniscus velocity remains constant when the meniscus is closer to the magnet and is directly proportional to the magnet velocity. For a given magnet velocity, irrespective of the initial location of the magnet, a fixed steady state meniscus velocity is achieved. We demonstrated forward motion, stopping and reverse motion of the ferrofluid meniscus by controlling the motion of the magnet, which could find applications in biological and chemical analysis.





  • Brain–computer interface connected to telemedicine and telecommunication in virtual reality applications
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: July 2017
    Source:Telematics and Informatics, Volume 34, Issue 4

    Author(s): Wei-Yen Hsu

    A novel brain–computer interface work is proposed for the applications of virtual reality in telemedicine and telecommunication in this study, in which the aim is to enhance the interactions between the humans and computers with virtual reality technologies. The system mainly contains automatic artifacts removal, feature extraction, significant feature selection and classification. A similarity measure approach is proposed to automatically remove the artifacts, which effectively reduce the influence of artifacts and simultaneously achieve higher accuracy. The artificial bee colony algorithm is used to select significant sub-features from feature combinations, which further greatly enhance the classification accuracy. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system performs better than several state-of-the-art approaches. It is also recommended that it is suitable for the applications of virtual reality in telemedicine and telecommunication.





  • Rapid profiling and pharmacokinetic studies of major compounds in crude extract from Polygonum multiflorum by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS and UPLC–MS/MS
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 5 June 2017
    Source:Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, Volume 140

    Author(s): Linlin Wang, Mangmang Sang, Erwei Liu, Prince Osei Banahene, Yi Zhang, Tao Wang, Lifeng Han, Xiumei Gao

    A reliable, rapid analytical method was established for characterization of constituents in the ethanol extract of Polygonum multiflorum by combining an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS). 131 constituents which including phenolic acids, stilbenes, flavones, anthraquinones, naphthalenes and their derivatives were identified or tentatively identified by using characteristic diagnostic fragment ions and references. The established method was further applied to analyze blood samples, and successfully identified 41 compounds which were absorbed through the gastrointestine in rats after administration the extract of P. multiflorum. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic studies of some major compounds in blood were investigated by using ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) method. This study showed a comprehensive research of P. multiflorum, which could provide a meaningful basis for further quality control, pharmacological as well as toxicological researches.

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  • Differences in photoplethysmography morphological features and feature time series between two opposite emotions: Happiness and sadness
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Artery Research, Volume 18

    Author(s): Fei Li, Licai Yang, Hongyu Shi, Chengyu Liu

    It has been well established that change in emotion state is associated with the change in physiological signals. This paper aimed to investigate the differences of finger photoplethysmography (PPG) morphological features and feature time series between happiness and sadness emotion states. Fifty-three volunteers were enrolled. Finger PPG signals were recorded under two emotion states with a random measurement order (first happiness emotion measurement then sadness or reverse). Seven morphological features were extracted, including three temporal features (T, T1 and T2), three area features (A, A1 and A2) and one amplitude feature (Amp). Five variability indices from the 5-min feature time series were calculated, including two time-domain indices (SDNN and RMSSD) and three frequency-domain indices (LFn, HFn and LF/HF). Results showed that temporal features T2 and T were critical features for identifying the two emotion states since not only they themselves but also their three frequency-domain variability indices had significant differences between the two emotion states. For area features, only two frequency-domain variability indices of LFn and HFn for A1 feature time series reported significant differences. Amplitude feature Amp itself, as well as its variability indices, did not had significant differences between the two emotion states. These results indicated that temporal features were more sensitive to response to emotion change than area and amplitude features. Moreover, compared with time-domain variability indices, frequency-domain variability indices were more suitable for short-term 5-min time series analysis for exploring the inherent but slight change due to the emotion effect.





  • The clinical manifestations of vestibular migraine: A review
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Auris Nasus Larynx, Volume 44, Issue 3

    Author(s): Ashley P. O’Connell Ferster, Adrian J. Priesol, Huseyin Isildak

    Objectives To provide an overview of vestibular migraines presentation, pathology, and diagnosis, as well as an update on current diagnostic criteria. Methods A review of the most recent literature on vestibular migraines was performed. Results Vestibular migraine is a process with significant impact on the quality of life for those afflicted with the disease, with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo and migraine symptoms lasting several minutes to 72h. Inner ear disease can co-exist with migraine and the vestibular symptoms occurring with vestibular migraine can mimic inner ear disorders providing a challenge for clinicians in establishing diagnosis. Recent diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine proposed by a joint committee of the Bárány Society and the International Headache Society provide an important standard for clinical diagnosis and research endeavor. Conclusion Vestibular migraine is a challenging disease process to both diagnose and treat. Proper diagnosis and treatment requires a thorough understanding of the current literature.





  • A novel dominant D109A CRYAB mutation in a family with myofibrillar myopathy affects αB-crystallin structure
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:BBA Clinical, Volume 7

    Author(s): Jakub P. Fichna, Anna Potulska-Chromik, Przemysław Miszta, Maria Jolanta Redowicz, Anna M. Kaminska, Cezary Zekanowski, Sławomir Filipek

    Myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) is a group of inherited muscular disorders characterized by myofibrils dissolution and abnormal accumulation of degradation products. So far causative mutations have been identified in nine genes encoding Z-disk proteins, including αB-crystallin (CRYAB), a small heat shock protein (also called HSPB5). Here, we report a case study of a 63-year-old Polish female with a progressive lower limb weakness and muscle biopsy suggesting a myofibrillar myopathy, and extra-muscular multisystemic involvement, including cataract and cardiomiopathy. Five members of the proband's family presented similar symptoms. Whole exome sequencing followed by bioinformatic analysis revealed a novel D109A mutation in CRYAB associated with the disease. Molecular modeling in accordance with muscle biopsy microscopic analyses predicted that D109A mutation influence both structure and function of CRYAB due to decreased stability of oligomers leading to aggregate formation. In consequence disrupted sarcomere cytoskeleton organization might lead to muscle pathology. We also suggest that mutated RQDE sequence of CRYAB could impair CRYAB chaperone-like activity and promote aggregation of lens crystallins.





  • A novel perceptual discrimination training task: Reducing fear overgeneralization in the context of fear learning
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Behaviour Research and Therapy, Volume 93

    Author(s): Rivkah Ginat-Frolich, Zohar Klein, Omer Katz, Tomer Shechner

    Generalization is an adaptive learning mechanism, but it can be maladaptive when it occurs in excess. A novel perceptual discrimination training task was therefore designed to moderate fear overgeneralization. We hypothesized that improvement in basic perceptual discrimination would translate into lower fear overgeneralization in affective cues. Seventy adults completed a fear-conditioning task prior to being allocated into training or placebo groups. Predesignated geometric shape pairs were constructed for the training task. A target shape from each pair was presented. Thereafter, participants in the training group were shown both shapes and asked to identify the image that differed from the target. Placebo task participants only indicated the location of each shape on the screen. All participants then viewed new geometric pairs and indicated whether they were identical or different. Finally, participants completed a fear generalization test consisting of perceptual morphs ranging from the CS + to the CS-. Fear-conditioning was observed through physiological and behavioural measures. Furthermore, the training group performed better than the placebo group on the assessment task and exhibited decreased fear generalization in response to threat/safety cues. The findings offer evidence for the effectiveness of the novel discrimination training task, setting the stage for future research with clinical populations.





  • Beauty in the eye of the beholder: Using facial electromyography to examine the association between eating disorder symptoms and perceptions of emaciation among undergraduate women
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Body Image, Volume 21

    Author(s): Dorian R. Dodd, Elizabeth A. Velkoff, Lauren N. Forrest, Lauren M. Fussner, April Smith

    Thin-ideal internalization, drive for thinness, and over-evaluation of the importance of thinness are associated with eating disorders (EDs). However, little research has examined to what extent perceptions of emaciation are also associated with ED symptoms. In the present study, 80 undergraduate women self-reported on ED symptomatology and perceptions of emaciated, thin, and overweight female bodies. While participants viewed images of these different body types, facial electromyography was used to measure activation of facial muscles associated with disgust reactions. Emaciated and overweight bodies were rated negatively and elicited facial responses consistent with disgust. Further, ED symptomatology was associated with pronounced aversion to overweight bodies (assessed via self-report pleasantness ratings), and attenuated negative affect to emaciated bodies (assessed via facial electromyography). The latter association was significant even when controlling for self-reported perceptions of emaciation, suggesting that psychophysiological methods in ED research may provide valuable information unavailable via self-report.





  • When a hit sounds like a kiss: An electrophysiological exploration of semantic processing in visual narrative
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Brain and Language, Volume 169

    Author(s): Mirella Manfredi, Neil Cohn, Marta Kutas

    Researchers have long questioned whether information presented through different sensory modalities involves distinct or shared semantic systems. We investigated uni-sensory cross-modal processing by recording event-related brain potentials to words replacing the climactic event in a visual narrative sequence (comics). We compared Onomatopoeic words, which phonetically imitate action sounds (Pow!), with Descriptive words, which describe an action (Punch!), that were (in)congruent within their sequence contexts. Across two experiments, larger N400s appeared to Anomalous Onomatopoeic or Descriptive critical panels than to their congruent counterparts, reflecting a difficulty in semantic access/retrieval. Also, Descriptive words evinced a greater late frontal positivity compared to Onomatopoetic words, suggesting that, though plausible, they may be less predictable/expected in visual narratives. Our results indicate that uni-sensory cross-model integration of word/letter-symbol strings within visual narratives elicit ERP patterns typically observed for written sentence processing, thereby suggesting the engagement of similar domain-independent integration/interpretation mechanisms.





  • Rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings: Present status and prospective
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: 1 June 2017
    Source:Ceramics International, Volume 43, Issue 8

    Author(s): Yue Xu, Xunxun Hu, Fangfang Xu, Kunwei Li

    Due to drastic decreasing in mechanical properties at relative high temperature, traditional nickel based super alloys are replaced by Si-based non-oxide ceramics in the application of high temperature aero-engines. In order to reduce the spallation and deformation of aero-engine blades in the environment containing high temperature water vapor and oxygen, protection coatings on the surface of the ceramics are required. Owing to high temperature stability, superior oxidation resistance and corrosion resistance properties, rare earth (RE) silicates are promising as candidates and play an important role in improving the high-temperature mechanical/thermal properties of Si-based non-oxide ceramics. In this review, recent progress in the research and development of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are summarized. Development of EBCs is presented, and the multi-scale structures and properties of each part are introduced. In addition, the merits and demerits of each preparation technique are discussed. As a promising candidate for the application in high temperature aero-engines, Si/mullite/Lu2Si2O7–Lu2SiO5 EBCs are highlighted.





  • Myotonic dystrophy: disease repeat range, penetrance, age of onset, and relationship between repeat size and phenotypes
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, Volume 44

    Author(s): Kevin Yum, Eric T Wang, Auinash Kalsotra

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease primarily characterized by myotonia and progressive muscle weakness. The pathogenesis of DM involves microsatellite expansions in noncoding regions of transcripts that result in toxic RNA gain-of-function. Each successive generation of DM families carries larger repeat expansions, leading to an earlier age of onset with increasing disease severity. At present, diagnosis of DM is challenging and requires special genetic testing to account for somatic mosaicism and meiotic instability. While progress in genetic testing has been made, more rapid, accurate, and cost-effective approaches for measuring repeat lengths are needed to establish clear correlations between repeat size and disease phenotypes.





  • Nanoconjugate-bound adenosine A1 receptor antagonist enhances recovery of breathing following acute cervical spinal cord injury
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Experimental Neurology, Volume 292

    Author(s): Zeljka Minic, Sharowyn Wilson, Fangchao Liu, Abdulghani Sankari, Guangzhao Mao, Harry Goshgarian

    Respiratory complications in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are common and can have a negative impact on the quality of patients' lives. Previously, we found that intradiaphragmatic administration of the nanoconjugate-bound A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) induced recovery of diaphragm function following SCI in rats. When administered immediately following the injury, recovery was observed as early as 3days following SCI and it persisted until the end of the study, 28days after the drug delivery. The recovery was observed using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMG) as well as phrenic nerve recordings; both of which were conducted under anesthetized conditions. Confounding effects of anesthetic may make data interpretation complex in terms of the impact on overall ventilatory function and clinical relevance. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that intradiaphragmatic administration of nanoconjugate-bound DPCPX, enhances recovery of ventilation following SCI in the unanesthetized rat. To that end, Sprague-Dawley rats underwent C2 spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) on day 0 and received either: (i) 0.15μg/kg of nanoconjugate-bound DPCPX or (ii) vehicle control (50μl distilled water). To assess ventilation, unrestrained whole body plethysmography (WBP) was performed on day 0 (immediately before the surgery) and 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28days following the SCI. Frequency, tidal volume, and minute ventilation data were analyzed in two minute bins while the animal was calm and awake. We found that a single administration of the nanoconjugate-bound A1 adenosine receptor antagonist facilitated recovery of tidal volume and minute ventilation following SCI. Furthermore, the treatment attenuated SCI-associated increases in respiratory frequency. Taken together, this study suggests that the previously observed DPCPX nanoconjugate-induced recovery in diaphragmatic and phrenic motor outputs may translate to a clinically meaningful improvement in ventilatory function in patients with SCI.





  • Effects of structural and textural properties of brittle cereal foams on mechanisms of oral breakdown and in vitro starch digestibility
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Food Research International, Volume 96

    Author(s): Syed Ariful Alam, Saara Pentikäinen, Johanna Närväinen, Ulla Holopainen-Mantila, Kaisa Poutanen, Nesli Sozer

    Structural and textural properties as well as the dietary fibre content of solid cereal foams influence the oral breakdown of structure, bolus formation and digestibility. The aim of this study was to investigate how structural differences of solid cereal foams (puffs vs. flakes) affect in vivo chewing and in vitro starch digestion. Four extruded puffs and flakes were produced from endosperm rye flour by extrusion processing without or with 10% rye bran (RB) addition. Extruded puffs and flakes were masticated by fifteen healthy females and the process was monitored using electromyography. Extruded puffs were more porous than flakes (97% vs 35%). The two products were also significantly different (p <0.05) in their structural and textural properties such as expansion, hardness, density and crispiness. A negative correlation was observed between hardness and crispiness index (p <0.05, r =0.950) and density and porosity (p <0.05, r =0.964). Addition of 10% RB had a significant effect on structural, textural and mastication properties both for puffs and flakes. Mastication of puffs required less total work than flakes (204 vs. 456%) and they were degraded to smaller particles than flakes during mastication. Irrespectively of the considerable differences in structure, texture and oral disintegration process, no significant (p <0.05) differences were observed between puffs and flakes (86.4 vs. 85.1) in terms of starch hydrolysis index. RB addition increased the hydrolysis index of puffs and flakes to 89.7 and 94.5, respectively, which was probably attributable to the increased number of particles in the bolus.





  • Protection of the genitofemoral nerve using endoscopic assistance in minimally invasive lateral lumbar fusion
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery, Volume 8

    Author(s): Thomas K. Lee, Joseph S. Yazdi, Kenneth E. Floro, Processo T. Arenos, Jessica R. Lee

    Postoperative groin and thigh dysesthesias are known potential sequelae of minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusions (LLIF). Injury to the genitofemoral nerve (GFN) may play some role in occurrence of these symptoms. Our goals were to determine a precise, reproducible manner of diagnosing postoperative GFN dysfunction, and to evaluate an endoscopic assisted LLIF as a viable method of identifying and protecting the GFN. We performed a retrospective review of 21 consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic-assisted LLIF at 33 disc levels. CO2 insufflation was performed through a laterally placed incision. The GFN was visualized over the surface of the psoas muscle and mobilized away from the surgical corridor. The rest of the surgery proceeded as previously described (Ozgur et al., 2006 [18]). The presence of GFN injury was defined as a subjective sense of pain, numbness, or dysesthesias in the GFN territory, or an objective decrease in sensation in the ipsilateral femoral triangle. The patients were followed for an average of 15.1months (range of 2 to 41months). The GFN was identified in the surgical corridor in seven cases. In 6 patients, the nerve was easily mobilized. In one patient, intramuscular dissection was required. This patient experienced temporary diminished sensation in the territory of the GFN. Therefore, our rate of transient genitofemoral neuropathy was 4.8%, and there were no cases of permanent nerve damage. This paper further confirms the specific sensory distribution of the femoral branch of the GFN and also provides in vivo evidence that the vulnerably situated GFN can be safely mobilized and avoided using an endoscopic direct look.





  • Atypical anatomy associated with a lumbar far lateral disc herniation
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery, Volume 8

    Author(s): Michael D. Staudt, Abhishek Ray, Alia Hdeib, Jonathan P. Miller

    Far lateral disc herniation is an uncommon but potentially significant cause of intractable leg pain associated with compression of the exiting nerve root and associated dorsal root ganglion. Since far lateral disc herniations are located outside the spinal canal, several minimally invasive paraspinal muscle-splitting techniques have been developed that allow for neural decompression with reduced soft tissue and bony trauma compared with conventional midline approaches. However, minimally invasive approaches require familiarity with the microsurgical anatomy of the extra-foraminal compartment because of the limited exposure. We report a case of an atypical anatomic relationship identified during far lateral discectomy involving a disc fragment located in a superolateral location relative to the exiting nerve root rather than the more common inferomedial location. This report highlights that familiarity with atypical locations of an extra-foraminal disc herniation and careful exploration of all quadrants in the surgical field is important during minimally invasive far lateral discectomy.





  • Meralgia paresthetica following prone position in posterior lumbar spinal surgery: Case series and review of the literature
    28 mars 2017
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery, Volume 8

    Author(s): Neil J. Majmundar, Darshan Shastri, Rachid Assina, Ira M. Goldstein







 

Mis à jour le 03 avril 2013